Cleaning

Dental hygiene, also known as oral hygiene, is the process by which preventative dental care is provided to avoid dental emergencies. At the core of dental hygiene is the in-home dental care regimen you perform. Your at-home regimen is supplemented with professional preventative dental care provided by dentists and licensed dental hygienists.

While you are responsible for day-to-day dental maintenance, dental hygienists, along with general dentists, family dentists and cosmetic dentists, play an integral role in preventative oral care.

Tooth brushing is fundamentally important, though it alone will not remove the calculus (also called tartar or dental plaque) that builds up over time. Calculus must be removed to lower your risk of toothaches, cavities, periodontal disease or even the loss of all your teeth. By removing calculus, you can reduce your chances of needing root canals, tooth extractions, dental bridges, crowns and more.

Early gum disease treatment may include tooth scaling and cleaning at three-month intervals along with use of medicated mouthwash and proper flossing. Later-stage gum disease treatment may include deep-plane scaling, periodontal surgery and laser surgery. General dentists, family dentists, periodontists and cosmetic dentists may perform gum disease treatment. However, availability of the latest material, technology and the level of expertise varies among dentists.


ClearCorrect Braces

A clear aligner system used to straighten teeth as an alternative to traditional braces. Similar to other clear aligner brands (like Invisalign) available to dentists or orthodontists certified to offer them to their patients, ClearCorrect straightens teeth using a series of clear, custom-made, removable aligners that gradually move teeth a little bit at a time, eventually correcting the teeth and smile to elicit a new, revitalized look.


Cosmetic Dentistry

Dental crowns can repair extensively decayed or damaged teeth. Dental crowns can be made of gold metals, silver metals, porcelain or a combination of porcelain and metal. In some cases, conservative dental veneers may replace the need for a dental crown. General dentists, family dentists, prosthodontists, pediatric dentists and cosmetic dentists may perform the crown procedure; however, expertise varies among dentists.  Dental bridges replace missing teeth with artificial replacements (pontic). The pontic is held in place by composite materials that are anchored to surrounding teeth. General dentists and prosthodontists may perform bridge procedures. Availability of the latest materials, technology and expertise varies among dentists.  Most dentists agree that porcelain veneers offer the most natural, tooth-like aesthetics. Porcelain has a translucent quality that is quite similar to tooth enamel. It is also highly resistant to staining and chipping due to the strength of the material and the glaze that is applied after treatment.

Dental Fillings

Used to repair damage to the structure of a tooth or teeth. Structural damage can be caused as a result of tooth decay, wear or trauma. After the removal of a problematic tooth structure, the tooth is restored with one of several filling materials: gold, amalgam, composite resin (white filling material) or porcelain. Each filling material has its advantages and disadvantages. Your dentist will work with you to determine which material is appropriate for you.

Dentures

Used to replace missing teeth or damaged teeth that cannot be otherwise repaired. General dentists, family dentists, prosthodontists, and cosmetic dentists may perform the procedure. However, availability of the latest material, technology and expertise varies among dentists.

Extractions

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Implant Restoration

Used to replace missing teeth or damaged teeth that cannot be otherwise repaired. General dentists, family dentists, prosthodontists, and cosmetic dentists may perform the procedure. However, availability of the latest material, technology and expertise varies among dentists.

When it comes to dental procedures, tooth extraction — or having teeth “pulled” — is among patients’ most dreaded prospects. Also referred to as exodontia, tooth extraction involves removing a tooth from its socket in the jaw bone. Before your dentist considers extraction, every effort will be made to try to repair and restore your tooth. However, sometimes it’s necessary for your overall health.

  • Simple Extractions: These are performed on teeth that are visible in the mouth. General dentists commonly do simple extractions, and most are usually done under a local anesthetic, with or without anti-anxiety medications or sedation.

  • Surgical Extractions: These involve teeth that cannot easily be seen or reached in the mouth, either because they have broken off at the gum line or they have not fully erupted. Performed by dentists or oral surgeons, surgical extractions require some type of surgical procedure, such as bone removal, removing and/or lifting and folding back all or part of the gum tissue to expose the tooth, or breaking the tooth into pieces (called tooth sectioning). Surgical extractions can be done with local anesthesia and/or conscious sedation. Patients with special medical conditions and young children may receive general anesthesia.

Dental implants are artificial tooth roots used to support a restoration for a missing tooth or teeth, helping to stop or prevent jaw bone loss. The implantation procedure is categorized as a form of prosthetic (artificial replacement) dentistry, but also is considered a form of cosmetic dentistry.

People who have lost teeth might feel too self-conscious to smile or talk. Additionally, biting irregularities caused by tooth loss can have a negative effect on eating habits, leading to secondary health problems like malnutrition.

By replacing missing tooth roots, dental implants provide people with the strength and stability required to eat all the foods they love, without struggling to chew. Additionally, they help to stimulate and maintain jaw bone, preventing bone loss and helping to support facial features.

Sleep Apnea Appliances

Sleep apnea, the cessation of breathing during sleep, is a common problem that affects both adults and children. Certain types of sleep apnea can be treated by your dentist or oral surgeon. However your doctor may also be a part of the diagnosis and treatment.

The National Institutes of Health estimate that more than 12 million Americans have sleep apnea, most often undetected or misdiagnosed. In fact, conservative estimates suggest that only 16 percent of sleep apnea sufferers receive treatment.

Untreated sleep apnea affects your well-being and may contribute to high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction, as well as to memory and concentration impairment. Since it reduces the quality of your sleep and contributes to daytime sleepiness, driving becomes more dangerous. In fact, sleep apnea is a leading cause of car accidents.

Whitening

It may surprise you to learn that many dental professionals believe that dentist-dispensed whitening trays and whitening strips – when used as directed – can be even more successful than in-office bleaching over the long haul. A key reason is their ongoing use, combined with the fact that small amounts of bleach remain within the tooth structure for up to 36 hours. When a new dose of bleach is applied to a tooth retaining the previous day’s peroxide, its effect is greater.